Tuesday, February 24, 2015

How to survive an earthquake.

When we think of a natural disaster,we tend to think of the worst possible thing.Some people think of earthquakes, tornadoes, or even a tsunami. Earthquakes are not really a big deal in California. Just the other day we had a 5.7, and when it happened I was in the middle of a history test, I remember our teacher just stopped. He asked us to get under our desks and a couple of seconds later we got back up, then we continued with our test. It wasn't a big deal. A couple of years back we had a 6.4 and when that hit you could feel it, the fish tank was shaking back and forth and with every swaying motion the tank would spill some water. My friends parents ran in the living room and grabbed us, pulling us into the nearest door way. The earthquake took a good 2 or 3 minutes and before we knew it the everything stopped shaking and we were all fine.

Most people have heard of the "Duck and Cover" method, a method developed in the 1950's when the effects of the atomic bomb was unknown. What we know now is that the "Duck and Cover" method will definitely save you from an atomic bomb, but "Duck and Cover" can protect you from an earthquake. On average California can get about 12,000 to 14,000 earthquakes a year, or about 35 earthquakes a day. In the event of  an earthquake if you are indoors try to find a big table or a chair to protect your neck with. By crouching down and putting your neck and upper back under the table of chair, holding one of the legs to prevent it from moving, this is the best way to avoid falling objects while indoors during an earthquake. If you are outdoors and close to a building, try to get to the porch of the building, or try to get into a building. If you are not by any buildings, try to get to an open field without any trees or power lines. Remember to always protect your neck and your head by covering them up during an earthquake. For more information on earthquakes you can visit the USGS, or The National Geographic website.

4 comments:

  1. This is really good information and it has that could save lives (that dose save life's). I think it was a great thing that you wrote your post about this. But is it better to be inside or outside during an earthquake? And what do you do if you are trapped under the table or chair? That has always confused me scene I have never experienced an earthquake till I moved up here..

    ReplyDelete
  2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I agree with you. Earthquakes aren't really that much of a bid deal. Some people just over react and get scared. What they should really be scared of is tornadoes, tsunamis, etc. I think the "duck and cover" method is not helpful. I mean I know that if theirs an earthquake during school, we have to get under our desk, but what if something fell off the ceiling or the whole building collapsed and the desk broke in half. Now we would all be injured or who knows. Just my opinon.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is good information to know, since earthquakes do occur a lot here in California. I think it is funny talking to people who are not from around here. They tell me that their worst fear of a natural disaster is earthquakes and that they would much rather have a tornado come along. For me I have the opposite opinion. I would rather have an earthquake any day! I remember when we had the 6.4 earthquake; I looked out the window while it was happening and I actually saw the parked cars outside shake and the pictures on the walls came tumbling down. It was interesting to go to the Bayshore Mall after the event and look at the effects that the earthquake caused. It even caused cement to crack!

    ReplyDelete